PMO

What Defines A Good Leader?

AUTHORED BY CHUCK LYLES, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER @ GUIDEIT

 Chuck Lyles, Chief Executive Officer @ GuideIT

Chuck Lyles, Chief Executive Officer @ GuideIT

A good leader is always striving toward bettering themselves as an individual and approaching every task with an attitude of servitude. The only way you are going to know what your team needs from you in order to be more successful is to listen to them. Successful teams perform much better when they know they have confidence that you chose the right team to get the job done.

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Listening, possessing confidence, and respect for, and in, your team are only a few traits that make up a great leader.  But leaders must also work toward bettering themselves as individuals if they want their team to listen, respect, and have confidence in them.  It works both ways.  Leaders must not only make a call to action to their team for these qualities, but they must make a call to action for themselves which requires lifelong tuning.

1.      Accountability

Extraordinary leaders take responsibility for everyone's performance, including their own. They follow up on all outstanding issues, check in on employees, and monitor the effectiveness of company policies and procedures. When problems arise, they identify them quickly, seek solutions, and get things back on track.

2.      Honesty

Strong leaders treat people the way they want to be treated. They are extremely ethical and believe that honesty, effort, and reliability form the foundation of success. They embody these values so overtly that no employee doubts their integrity for a minute. They share information openly and avoid spin control.

3.      Coaching

The best leaders guide employees through challenges, always on the lookout for solutions to foster the long-term success of the organization. Rather than making things personal when they encounter problems, or assigning blame to individuals, leaders look for constructive solutions and focus on moving forward.

4.      Awareness

A great leader conducts themselves in a way that sets them apart from their employees--not in a manner that suggests they are better than others, but in a way that permits them to retain an objective perspective on everything that's going on in their organization. 

5.      Decisiveness

All leaders must make tough decisions.  It goes with the job. Extraordinary leaders must possess a high level of independence and execute difficult and timely decisions made in the best interests of the entire organization. Many decisions require a firmness, authority, and finality, but an extraordinary leader also knows when not to act unilaterally but instead foster collaborative decision-making.

Human dignity, personal responsibility, and humility should always be at the forefront of a good leaders thoughts and executions, and it takes daily conditioning and effort. 

The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is a genetic factor to leadership. That’s nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born. —Warren Bennis

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Leader Achievement: Advancing People Forward

AUTHORED BY JEFF SMITH, VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES @ GUIDEIT

 Jeff Smith, Vice President of Sales @ GuideIT

Jeff Smith, Vice President of Sales @ GuideIT

I have always been fascinated by the different leadership styles I have witnessed and have worked for in my 35 years in the IT field.  It is my belief that a leader, good or bad, has a direct impact on the achievements and accomplishments of those who work for them. I also believe that one’s leadership style is not something that is taught, rather is inherent in their overall personality.

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If someone in their everyday life is known as a caring, giving person, they will tend to lead with a style that emphasizes caring more about individual and team achievements than their own personal achievement. If someone in their everyday life is more self-centered, caring more about themselves rather than others, they will tend to focus on trying to advance their own career off the work of their subordinates, and spending the majority of their time managing UP versus managing across.

When I became a leader over an IT Business Development team in my early 30’s, I felt a calling to lead with the same personality and purpose that I believe I have in my everyday life.   I felt a responsibility to help others learn and grow, to have direct communications with them, to take responsibility, and truly wanted to contribute to the success of each individual, the team and a bigger purpose.  Our overall goal was to find, close and sign new business, which we did well.  But for me, signing business never yielded the same reward as watching the development of the team and individual team members, getting compliments about a team member, or having associates from other teams say that they would love to be part of Our Team.  And there was nothing better than having a newly signed customer tell you what they saw in us over the competition was a better team of people and a team that they wanted to partner with.

When you become a leader, it’s my belief that your greatest achievements come from the opportunities you provide team members for personal growth, from the recognition of your team members for their dedication and their hard work, and most importantly when you know and feel they embrace you and trust you as their leader.

So if you are a leader constantly ask yourself, how you can best lead them, serve them, support them and engage with them. When you are thinking of these things I believe you have achieved being a great leader. 

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Integrity - An Internal Compass

AUTHORED BY MARK JOHNSON, VICE PRESIDENT, MANAGED SERVICES @ GUIDEIT

 Mark Johnson, Vice President, Managed Services @ GuideIT

Mark Johnson, Vice President, Managed Services @ GuideIT

Not long ago the call went out for a volunteer to write the next installment of our series of GuideIT Values blog entries.  With the topic being “integrity” I quickly said “I’ll take that one”, thinking to myself “hey that’s an easy one to knock out.”  Well, as it turns out, not so much.

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As I put fingers to keys I started with the predictable list of “challenges to integrity” but soon had to ask myself, how do you write about integrity in a way that doesn’t come across as either sanctimonious or overly simplistic?  And further, how do you translate a critical foundation of character into mere words?

At GuideIT our Founders adopted this approach in an attempt to express what integrity means to us:  “We will hold each other to unquestionable standards of honesty and ethics, in words and actions, and operate with transparency.”

Helpful, but still what does that mean?  If integrity in business meant simply being honest, it’s not a terribly high bar to clear, though isn’t it sad how some don’t?  No, too often we’re faced with opportunities to “pass or fail” an integrity test in far less visible ways, or ways in which there’s not necessarily a clear cut “right” answer.  That’s where the “unquestionable” part comes in.  The standard is clear, the measure remains harder to quantify.  But let’s face it – we all know it when we see it.  So do our fellow team members, and so do our customers.

Can you teach integrity?  I’d say yes and no.  Without question you can use day to day opportunities (and challenges) in business to guide your team members towards what it means to operate in the center of the ethical playing field, whether leading by example yourself, or providing specific guidance about your expectations for ethical behavior as situations arise.  So yes, you can absolutely teach integrity, but only to a point.

No matter how hard you work to establish an environment conducive to both earning and maintaining trust, inherently there is still an element of character that has to come from within, one that if missing will never consistently meet the expectation to operate with “unquestionable standards of honesty.”  To me, that internal compass is called having a conscience, emboldened with the courage to choose the harder right, rather than the easier wrong, even when the decision or the results may not be popular.  There are lots of people who know the right thing to do; at GuideIT we look for the ones actually willing to do it, and hold everyone, including our leaders, to that same standard.

At GuideIT our motto is “Do Technology Right.”  As I reflected on what I initially thought was a simple marketing slogan, my “ah-ha moment” was when I realized it also provides a straight forward approach to operating with integrity.  “Do Technology Right”, absolutely.  But how about, simply do what’s right.

I guess it wasn’t all that hard after all.

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How Do You Build A Team That Works?

AUTHORED BY DEANA EILAND, VICE PRESIDENT OF DELIVERY @ GUIDEIT

Teamwork...

 Deana Eiland, Vice President of Delivery @ GuideIT

Deana Eiland, Vice President of Delivery @ GuideIT

Teams are a fundamental part of our work and personal lives.  But, creating a team is not the same as creating a team that works.  Just as joining a team is not the same as performing as a team member.  Very simply, teams do not work without teamwork. Active, collaborative teamwork towards a common goal makes all the difference.

How do you build a team that works?

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  • Be Aware of How You Work – Know your strengths and weaknesses, hold yourself accountable, course-correct and modify your approach if needed to ensure you are leading from a position of strength.
  • Get to Know the Rest of the Team – Invest the time to know your team’s individual strengths and weaknesses, how they are wired and what motivates them to excel beyond what is expected.
  • Clearly Define Roles & Responsibilities – Each of your team member’s responsibilities should be interconnected and dependent on one another.  Unique strengths and differences can convert into a powerful united force when aligned properly.
  • Be Proactive with Feedback  - Feedback is a two-way street and is key to staying on track and course correcting when needed. 
  • Acknowledge and Reward – People love recognition and appreciate respect.  Take the time to give your team the accolades they have earned and deserve.
  • Always Celebrate Success! – In today’s fast-paced world, people often don’t take the time to take a step back and truly appreciate what it took to cross the finish line.  Don’t ignore it.  Your team’s accomplishment was likely with some sacrifice by team members.  Celebrating their success and overall impact of the achievement is critical.

"The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, but if they don't play together, the club won't be worth a dime." 

-Babe Ruth

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Individual Accountability, Part of A Whole

AUTHORED BY JOHN LYON, CHIEF OF FINANCE @ GUIDEIT

 John Lyon, Chief of Finance @ GuideIT

John Lyon, Chief of Finance @ GuideIT

The reality of organizational life is never black and white.  More often than not, accountability is muddled and people are not fully aware of the direct connection between their efforts and results.  We tend to keep ourselves from being productive simply by not holding ourselves accountable for our actions.  It is of utmost importance to first hold yourself accountable for your own obligations, commitments, and actions before participating in a team environment. 

Accountability is about improvement.  Improve oneself, and the team will respectively improve. Tom Price nails it when he said, "One person's embarrassment is another person's accountability."  We are all in a leadership role, as all team members are responsible for contributing to the success of the organization.  As leaders, without accountability, an organization would cease to exist.  You not only betray yourself by not owning up to your responsibilities, but your team as well.

The major leagues would never send a player on the field who has consistently missed mandatory practices, for obvious reasons; such an action would diminish the collective hard work of the other team members, and scores would decline rapidly.  The same goes for any type of team. There must be rules and adherence. A pattern toward advancing success.  And that pattern begins with the individual.  

It is up to me and no one else to make sure I am doing what I know I should be doing. When someone has to hold me accountable, because I failed to do what I should have done, I have a serious conversation with myself. My belief is that no one should have to hold me accountable for my actions, responsibilities and goals. While I appreciate others helping me get better, I am the one that must hold myself to a high standard.

I am convinced if you want to advance your life personally or professionally, you must hold yourself accountable for your actions, responsibilities, and goals.  Think about it. Commitment is a choice and a decision that should be made responsibly. Why should it be someone else’s job to make sure you are doing the things that you know you should be doing?


Encouraging Maximum Potential

AUTHORED BY TIM MORRIS, VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT @ GUIDEIT

Maximizing the greatest potential of an organization calls for an environment that fosters courage and encourages educated risks. Fostering and maintaining such an environment takes special care and attention.  However, an organization who's environment appreciates, nourishes, and respects courageous attempts will surely reap some truly amazing benefits:

 Tim Morris, Vice President, Business Development @ GuideIT

Tim Morris, Vice President, Business Development @ GuideIT

  • distinctive separation from industry growth expectations and standards
  • more empowered team members
  • the best possible services and/or solutions not only suggested, but actually delivered to and realized by clients.

I recall an incident from my childhood when my father told me we were going to “paint the house”.  I was not quite six years of age at the time.  We lived in a small pier and beam house with asbestos shingles for siding.  I noticed, in the garage, paint my dad purchased. I decided to surprise my dad by helping out, and began painting the house myself.  I took the initiative to open the paint, and paint an entire side of the house.  Well, my father came out and saw me painting the siding, but his intentions were to only paint the trim instead of the entire side of the house.  However, I was not scolded nor punished for my actions, regardless of the misunderstanding and miscommunication. And regardless of the unintended outcome (clearly not a positive one), because of his gentle reaction, I was not discouraged.  That lesson taught me to always continue to try new things, and catapulted me at many times in my life into experiencing more than my peers.

Operating within existing guidelines and comfort zones is like playing in a sandbox; sustainable positive outcomes are predictable and a business can thrive and achieve consistent results within industry standards. But only with courage to be creative, and courage to take risks, is it possible to expand the sandbox and drive results that create milestones and surpass the industry standards. Indeed, each and every act of courage will not result in a positive outcome, but a leader's stoic reaction to failure is what continually fosters and enables courage in others. And it is through creativity, risk taking, and courage that opportunities open for major breakthrough changes.

Patients Demand Technology

AUTHORED BY WENDY DURRE, CUSTOMER EXECUTIVE @ GUIDEIT

 Wendy Durre, Customer Executive @ GuideIT

Wendy Durre, Customer Executive @ GuideIT

What would you think if you walked into a physician’s office and they actually wrote down your appointment in an old-fashioned paper appointment book? Recently my mother called me to say she left a physician’s office because of this very thing.  Although she is in her 70’s and not necessarily tech savvy, it made her uneasy and less confident in that practice.  Why???  If they were using antiquated business practices, how would that effect her patient care and the way they treated her medical issue? 

As a person who works in the technology field, I am accustomed to helping providers implement and optimize technology.  Today’s customer (patient) has a different set of expectations; even those of just 10 years ago.   You don’t have to grow-up using video games to understand that technology is an integral part of the medical field and patient experience.

Recently a study was performed where 97% of the patients surveyed approved of their physician using technology (including desktop and mobile devices) in the exam room.  And, 58% felt that it positively impacts their overall experience, especially when used to educate and explain.  What I find ironic is that technology abounds and always has in the healthcare world; however we often hear that physicians/clinicians etc., are reluctant to adopt new technology despite the fact that their patients welcome it.  

While change is never comfortable, it is definitely necessary.  I predict physicians who choose not to adopt this new tech-savvy avenue will see a dramatic decline in the number of patients they see in their practice.   But, as long as technology doesn’t take away from the interpersonal communication they have with their patients, it will be an asset.  Not only will it improve their physician/patient experience, but their business practices as well.

Now what to do with all of that data?

Make it a great day!


The Touchy-Feely Side of IT

AUTHORED BY WENDY DURRE, CUSTOMER EXECUTIVE @ Guideit

 Wendy Durre, Customer Executive @ GuideIT

Wendy Durre, Customer Executive @ GuideIT

What do you think when you hear the “touchy-feely” side of IT?  Am I referring to a new, softer keyboard, something that works completely in Emoji’s?  Try again!  Believe it or not, TECHNOLOGY impacts our life not only in a practical way, but in an emotional way. 

What I’m saying is **YOU** have an impact on others and the world as an IT professional. If you have a career in IT, whether it be a Service Desk Agent, Project Manager, Developer, Marketer, or Executive Leader, you have experienced the touchy-feely side of IT...and you may not even realize it.

Have you ever thought about how your work impacts others? And how do you feel about your work?  According to a recent study, only 39% of employees believe that the meaningfulness (contribution of their job to society as a whole) of their job is important to overall job satisfaction.  61% are passionate about their work, and 71% say they frequently put all their effort into their work. The takeaway here is that employees who find their work meaningful and fulfilling are more likely to be engaged and do their work well.

Here’s an example.  Does your work assist in the creation of IT jobs or increase employment opportunities in the IT space? Your impact may look something like this: You hire a candidate. That candidate has a family.  That family lives in a home purchased through a realtor who helped them find the best location close to work.  That candidate also works with a team within the company.  That team services the needs of their customer.  That team works on maintaining the new EMR application adopted by a medical practice treating and assessing ER patients.  We are definitely beyond keyboard, servers, and code. 

By digging deeper and evaluating what our job is, we are able to understand that not only are we maintaining systems, we are impacting lives.  Every day as a result of your work, you impact hundreds of people.   It may seem like your job is a small part of a big process, but to those on the receiving end of your efforts, it is huge! 

I challenge you this week to see the scope of your impact on others through your job. I’d love to hear how it changes the way you see yourself in your company and community. So please leave your comments below and make it a great day!

Servant Leadership…How to Build Trust in The Midst of Turmoil

AUTHORED BY Ron hill, Vice president, sales @ GUIDEIT

 Ron Hill, VP of Sales 

Ron Hill, VP of Sales 

It was a sunny winter day and I had just started as the Client Executive at one of the largest accounts in the company. Little did I know, clouds were about to roll in. The CIO walked into my office and sat down with a big sigh. She communicated that they were ending our agreement and moving to a different service provider. We had 12 months. It required immediate action by our company, implications in the market would ensue, and an environment of uncertainty was born for our team of more than 700 people providing service support.  

This was no time to defend or accept defeat. We had to act. Our account leadership team readied the organization for the work ahead and imminent loss. We formally announced the situation to the organization. There were tears and some were even distraught. Our leadership team had not faced this situation before. The next 12 months looked daunting.

Regardless, it was time to lead. We created a “save” strategy and stepped into action beginning with daily team meetings. We invested time prioritizing and sharing action items and implications about information systems, project management, and the business process services. It was our job to operate with excellence, despite the past. It was our job to honorably communicate knowledge to the incoming service provider. One of the outcomes of our work was a weekly email outlining past week accomplishments and expectations for the next week. The email often included a blend of personal stories and team success. We even came up with a catchy brand for the email…Truth of the Matter. It turned out to be a key vehicle that kept our teams bonded and informed. Our leadership team used it as a vehicle to help maintain trust with the team. 

During our work, we also began to rebuild trust with the customer as we continued to support them in all phases of their operation. Because of our leadership team’s commitment to service, transparency, and integrity, the delivery team was inspired in achieving many great milestones during those 12 months. We were instrumental in helping our customer achieve multiple business awards including a US News and World Report top ranking. We also found ways to achieve goals that established new trends in their industry. Before we knew it, the year had come and gone and we were still there. 

Reflecting back, since that dark day when the CIO informed me that we were done, it was actually the beginning of more than a decade-long relationship. The team had accomplished an improbable feat. In the end, it was the focus of our leadership to come together with a single message and act with transparency…letting their guard down to build an environment of trust with the team and with the customer. This enabled all of us to focus on meeting the goals of the customer, together.

IT Project Management…Which Stakeholder Are You?

Authored by Guy Wolf, transformation executive @ guideit

 Guy Wolf, Transformation Executive

Guy Wolf, Transformation Executive

So much material has already been developed and published about what a PMO is, what it can be, and how to set one up.  Much of the material is banal. For those of you who are fans of Monty Python, the “How to do it” skit comes to mind. This particular post focuses on something else: a perspective on stakeholder roles and the importance of clear objectives.
 
Often PMOs get started for the wrong reasons, putting a solution in place before fully understanding the primary objective. Some promote focusing on achieving a level of maturity first. Others propose starting at the project level, and as you demonstrate proficiency, moving “up” to the program, then portfolio level.  The problem with these approaches is that the “what” is confused for the “how.”  
 
The best practice for an effective PMO is to develop a list of business objectives and customers that will be served with a business case that illustrates why implementing a PMO is better than the alternatives. The PMO, however one defines it, is not a project.  It is a business unit.  Therefore, just like Human Resources, Marketing, or Facilities, it must justify its existence by improving the lives of its customers.  What that means in your situation, and how to go about it, will be different from others. Below are some perspectives by role. 

Customer/CIO:  Nearly all business improvement initiatives have a large component of Information Technology (IT) at their core. Frequently, IT is the single largest component, and implementation is often on the critical path to achieving the desired end state. Additionally, IT departments often suffer from a practice of project management that excludes all other departments in an enterprise.  This disconnect can create a misalignment in critical path objectives. Unfortunately the CIO too often holds the bag at the end if the broader strategy and governance are not easily accessible. What the CIO needs is clear governance or a seat at the strategy table to manage a complex, inter-related portfolio of initiatives that will deliver success to the company.

CFO: CFO’s have an expectation to forecast and manage capital and operating expenses.  As enterprise business-change initiatives often carry high risk, a CFO has a strong desire to assure that processes are in place to alert leadership in advance of potential variances and manage expenses to the forecasted budget, even if it was set long before the project requirements were fully known.

CEO: charged with the overall success of the organization, the CEO must manage many competing priorities among multiple departments. Managing a global perspective includes oversight of limited availability in capital investment resources spread across multiple strategic priorities.  To that end, CEO’s require some method to weigh the various investment options and to select the combination that has the highest chance of achieving the overall organizational objectives.

Business Unit Leaders (Sponsors):  charged with growing and improving their areas of responsibility. They have a need for a well-defined process to engage IT resources in helping them prioritize projects and source them with the right resources. Furthermore, they need visibility to relevant status reporting with opportunity to make business decisions to navigate a successful result.
 
Steering Committee: responsible for weighing the costs, risks and benefits of multiple project options, often without certainty of the inputs.  They require a method that provides as much information as possible regarding objectives, resources, and stakeholders.  For projects underway, visibility to insights through reporting enables better decision-making throughout the process.

Project Managers: need support for collecting status data enabling focus on day-day decision making and management, not task-driven administration; access to resources across multiple matrixed towers in the organization; access to key stakeholders to make decisions and allow them to keep projects on track.

Team members: require easy data collection that helps reporting status and doesn't take a lot of time to use; respect for a balance of time to support operations as well as project demands from multiple project manager stakeholders.
 
Choosing objectives means limiting some, and eliminating others. Prioritization isn’t easy but it’s necessary to increase the probability of extending the long-term value of your projects. There are some great templates that can be used in building and operating a PMO to improve the quality and speed with which we achieve our goals. If you would like more information, drop a comment or email me at guy.wolf@guideit.com. I welcome your feedback, as we strive to do technology right, and do projects right.